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What Does the Future Hold for BIM?

Construction Tech Review | Friday, December 31, 2021

While BIM is currently widely used in the realm of design, it has not yet reached its full potential. Its time will come, and the construction process will be completely transformed when it comes. For the time being, it isn't easy to forecast precisely how; however, we can conceive a few possible approaches. One thing is sure, however: BIM is here to stay.

FREMONT, CA: BIM, an acronym for Building Information Modeling, is a term that typically refers to current design software that is utilized mainly by architects. This software builds a three-dimensional virtual model of a building in which all aspects necessary for its construction and upkeep are included. Apart from geometry and spatial linkages, this includes information about building materials, cost projections, and sustainability.

However, despite its various advanced features, BIM would be far less fascinating without its collaborative capabilities. The program may incorporate all relevant documents, designs, and timetables and make them accessible to the entire team. And if somebody modifies the model, it is automatically updated for everyone who has access to it.

In a broader sense, BIM is not merely software; it is also a new construction movement. Physical paperwork and lengthy talks regarding every facet of the project are a thing of the past. The entire team is expected to work collaboratively, effortlessly contributing to the project and enhancing efficiency. The distinctions that once existed between designers, builders, and contractors are dissolving and hopefully soon vanish totally.

What lies ahead for BIM in the future

BIM is already the preferred tool for many architects, engineers, and builders worldwide. However, given how quickly technology advances, who knows if this will still be the case in a few years?

While it's difficult to predict precisely, architects, engineers, and builders can make some educated estimates based on existing trends. Therefore, let them wait and see what the future has for BIM!

BIM will be compatible with third-party software.

Translation of data from one software to another is one of the most complex and time-consuming design and construction components. If two programs are incompatible, critical data may be lost, and the entire procedure may take several months. And consider how much work one could accomplish in that amount of time!

Fortunately, future technology will prioritize compatibility and collaboration. BIM is no exception—it should eventually merge seamlessly with AR/VR, 3D printing, the Internet of Things, and even artificial intelligence. Then, everything will go smoothly and almost entirely automatically, from design to maintenance!

For instance, suppose architects, engineers, and builders combine BIM and AI. They'd need to provide it with a simple set of rules, and the program would take care of the rest. Put an end to manual printing, exporting, and updating files and models. The BIM program will take care of all of that and even recognize when such measures are required on their own. Therefore, rather than waste time on trivial chores, direct attention to the more critical components of the project.

Additionally, merging BIM with augmented reality or virtual reality will fundamentally alter the sector. Consider the possibility of experiencing creation in a physical context rather than merely viewing it on a screen. That would significantly simplify the process of identifying faults and developing new and improved solutions for ideas!

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