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The Intersection of Building Automation System and IoT

Construction Tech Review | Thursday, August 19, 2021

With the IoT’s array of sensors, one can monitor just about everything inside the business in real-time, including temperature, air quality, energy use, and much more.

FREMONT, CA: Building automation systems (BAS), also known as Building Management Systems (BMS), have been in use for many years. Commercial building managers might use these computer-based management systems to manage and monitor the complicated mechanical, HVAC, and electrical equipment network that keeps a facility running. BAS systems are still the finest approach to control building environments today, and they will likely remain so for the foreseeable future.

A BAS is a command and control method that depends on humans to decide when and how specific tasks should be carried out. As a building manager, one instinctively knows when the lights and air conditioning units should be switched off daily, for example. These actions can then be programmed into the BAS.

But what if some areas of the structure are emptied before others? And what if it only happens once in a while, and not in a predictable way? The automatic schedule is still functional, but it is not ideal.

Facility managers that use the IoT in addition to their BAS, on the other hand, may be able to manage operations more strategically. They could install occupancy sensors around the building to collect data on occupancy 24/7. Not only can sensor data be utilized in real-time to switch off lights in places that are not being used, but a long-term study of the data—done via advanced analytics platforms that are not reliant on humans—can provide new insights into everyday space utilization. As a result, one can plan their building’s best lighting strategy and design the BAS accordingly.

With the IoT’s array of sensors, one can monitor just about everything inside the business in real-time, including temperature, air quality, energy use, and much more. And machine learning analytics tools can swiftly derive insights from all of the building’s data, allowing one to meet the objectives, whatever they may be.

Today’s building managers use the Internet of Things in conjunction with building automation systems to:

  • To limit the chance of COVID-19 spreading, maintain healthy indoor air quality.
  • To become more sustainable, practice more responsible water use and increase energy efficiency (and use the collected data to prove their efforts to stakeholders).
  • Reduce energy use to cut utility bills.
  • To comply with local and state standards, reduce carbon emissions.

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