Building the Foundations of a Data-Driven Tomorrow

Eugene Seah, Senior Director, Special Projects, Surbana Jurong

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Big Data And Xr To Reinvent Bim

Andrew Cox, Head of Data Compliance and Data Protection Officer, SNC-Lavalin

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3 Strategies to Reduce Construction and Demolition Waste

Michael Rosario, Construction Tech Review | Wednesday, November 25, 2020

Deconstruction lets higher value materials, such as doors, plumbing fixtures, windows, tiles, and lumber to be re-sold. Furthermore, deconstruction helps decrease the amount of dust and toxic materials released when buildings are destroyed.

FREMONT, CA: According to a report, 569 million tons of Construction and Demolition (C&D) waste was formed in the U.S. in 2017. That is more than twice the quantity of municipal solid waste. C&D waste materials are produced in new construction, demolitions, and renovations. Moreover, these materials contribute enormously to the waste stream.

Diminishing the disposal of C&D materials is significant in protecting the environment, preserving landfill space, and reducing economic strain on waste processing facilities. Below are three ways for lowering C&D waste.

1. Practice Deconstruction Before Demolition

Deconstruction, in contrast to demolition, comprises the process of unbuilding a structure or house. This feature can take the form of selective, or soft, a deconstruction that involves eliminating easily distinguishable, high-value materials. Deconstruction can also be achieved through a whole-house approach. In this course, the structure's wholeness is dismantled to recognize the principal amount of salvageable materials.

Deconstruction lets higher value materials, such as doors, plumbing fixtures, windows, tiles, and lumber to be re-sold. Furthermore, deconstruction helps decrease the amount of dust and toxic materials released when buildings are destroyed.

2. Order the Exact Amount of Materials

Plenty of C&D waste can be abridged merely by proper planning before commencing a job. This aspect ensures that an accurate amount and the right size of materials have been bought. Surplus materials such as lumber, concrete, and drywall might end up going to waste. Thus, it is imperative to get the right measures for the job. If one has excess material, they can try finding ways to reuse the material.

3. Recycle Materials That Cannot Be Reused

One effective way Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends reducing C&D waste is recycling. They endorse identifying building components that can be easily recycled, including:

  • Asphalt, concrete, and rubble.
  • Metals including steel, copper, and brass.
  • Wood and lumber scrap.
  • Cardboard packaging can also be recycled from construction places.

All of these elements can be delivered for recycling and, once appropriately sorted, can be used in several ways. Recycling of building materials continues to be progressively economically viable and, perhaps more significantly, an environmentally sound practice.

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